Professional Oboist Rachel Seiden recently posted a great insider’s look at the long and complicated road to building a career in classical music at the Vail Valley Music Festival website. Professional Oboist Rachel Seiden recently posted a great insider’s look at the long and complicated road to building a career in classical music at the Vail Valley Music Festival website. She includes the steely advice of an early instructor: “Why do we take auditions? To become accustomed to failure.” From there, Seiden goes through an enlightening run-down of a life of private lessons, college educations, ensemble playing, and one-on-one coaching. “Becoming part of an orchestra is a laborious and demanding process,” she says. “But the eventual ideal goal of winning an orchestral job, and therefore making money by making music, sustains us.”

Seiden’s full post can be found here and it’s a worthwhile read for anyone looking for a peek into this process.

Famed singer Barry Manilow (and SBO cover artist) recently donated a new Yamaha piano to help launch a music instrument drive in Kentucky’s Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, the state’s largest school district. Famed singer Barry Manilow (and SBO cover artist) recently donated a new Yamaha piano to help launch a music instrument drive in Kentucky’s Jefferson County Public Schools in Louisville, the state’s largest school district. He also announced that he would offer two free concert tickets (he performs in Louisville on July 27) to anyone else who donated an instrument of their own to the district.

Learn more about Manilow’s Music Project here.

Music director Marin Alsop recently led an army of amateur musicians through a week-long immersive music program alongside members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.Music director Marin Alsop recently led an army of amateur musicians through a week-long immersive music program alongside members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. The program invited 104 willing students to rehearse, socialize, take lessons, and study intensive lectures with the orchestra in what amounted to a classical music lover’s fantasy camp. The move marked another step toward connecting with the orchestra’s audience as well as a strong new source of revenue – fees for academy students ranged from $1,750 to $3,000.

The New York Times ran a glowing in-depth report from a music camper here.

Famed 25-year-old violinist Nicola Benedetti, who is set to perform this year at the BBC’s Last Night of the Proms, recently attacked the British school system for what she sees as a declining commitment to music education. Famed 25-year-old violinist Nicola Benedetti, who is set to perform this year at the BBC’s Last Night of the Proms, recently attacked the British school system for what she sees as a declining commitment to music education. According to UK program Radio Times, Benedetti told reporters that “decisions have been made, especially in the light of funding cuts, that are, I think, catastrophic to our future as a nation." Benedetti began studying violin at five years old and began attending formal music academy when she was 10 at the Yehudi Menuhin School. She rose to fame after being named the BBC Young Musician of the Year at 16.

Washington DC orchestra The National Philharmonic recently announced that it will begin partnering with the William E. Doar Public Charter School for the Performing Arts in an effort to get every student from kindergarten to 8th grade involved in music education.Washington DC orchestra The National Philharmonic recently announced that it will begin partnering with the William E. Doar Public Charter School for the Performing Arts in an effort to get every student from kindergarten to 8th grade involved in music education. According to the Washington Post, the program will include violin instruction for the youngest students, leading into piano and voice lessons with a concentration beginning in the 6th grade.

Click here to learn more.

Designer David Brothers has introduced a new orchestra chair designed to optimize musicians’ posture and breathing. Designer David Brothers has introduced a new orchestra chair designed to optimize musicians’ posture and breathing. Brothers, a professor at the New Jersey Institute of Technology’s School of Art and Design, says that focusing a chair’s ability to influence those factors will ultimately produce a better-sounding orchestra. His chairs are made of a lightweight carbon fiber and can be tilted forward with adjustable lumbar support and height for musicians of all sizes and instrumentation.

The product was recently featured in an in-depth article in Wired here.

The Chicago Tribune has collected a comprehensive list of the country’s best summer classical music festivals that could be a useful tool in any educator or musical parent’s calendar. The Chicago Tribune has collected a comprehensive list of the country’s best summer classical music festivals that could be a useful tool in any educator or musical parent’s calendar. The write-up includes details on programs, nearby sights, and dining options at events such as the Boston Symphony Orchestra’s Tanglewood, the Glimmerglass festival in Cooperstown, N.Y., the Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s Ravinia festival, and more.

Visit The Chicago Tribune to learn more.

The Sydney Morning Herald recently reported great news for Australian arts advocates – every student in the country’s school system will now study dance, drama, media arts, and visual arts until they’re 10. The Sydney Morning Herald recently reported great news for Australian arts advocates – every student in the country’s school system will now study dance, drama, media arts, and visual arts until they’re 10. Officials with the Australian Curriculum Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA) claimed that research had showed music programs in disadvantaged schools to boost the classroom participation of students and self-esteem to the point where it seemed to make sense to make the dramatic change in arts administration. Administrators also point to the country’s $30 billion creative arts field as a fertile field of employment opportunities.

Read the full story at the Sydney Morning Herald.

MakeMusic, Inc., creators of SmartMusic learning and assessment software, has announced the launch of the Music Education Standards and Assessment website MakeMusic, Inc., creators of SmartMusic learning and assessment software, has announced the launch of the Music Education Standards and Assessment website (online at www.musicstandards.org).

Music educators and administrators are increasingly aware of the rising expectations surrounding the measurement and documentation of student achievement. However, the design, funding and goals of arts assessment methodology vary widely at the state, the district and sometimes even the school level. The new website assembles this highly sought-after information, from all fifty states, in one place for the first time. As a result, music educators now have unprecedented access to vital information and best practices from across the country.

The website includes information on music standards, teacher evaluation policies and contacts for each state department of education and music educator association organizations. Visitors are given the opportunity to collaborate in a variety of ways, including providing updates and participating in state-level discussion forums. In addition to providing a platform for music educators, content from this site will also be used to support the National Symposium on Music Assessment, part of the National Association for Music Education's Music Education Week in Baltimore, June 24-25 (details at musiced.nafme.org).

View the Music Education Standards and Assessment website at www.musicstandards.org.

Fox News reports that University of Arkansas student Mitchell Moore won a spot on the school’s Razorback Marching Band, despite requiring cochlear implants to sense any sound at all. Fox News reports that University of Arkansas student Mitchell Moore won a spot on the school’s Razorback Marching Band, despite requiring cochlear implants to sense any sound at all.  Moore, born deaf in the right ear with minimal hearing in the left, began playing drums when he was three but had lost all hearing by the time he was eight.  In addition to the implants, Moore has also worked for years at learning to sense beats and sounds through the drum shells he held.  Moore also plans to study Bio-Medical Engineering in hopes of advancing technology for people with disabilities.

Read more at MyFoxAtlanta [http://www.myfoxatlanta.com/story/18680251/deaf-drummer].

 


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This year, our primary major band travel is for:

Festival Competitions - 42.5%
Public Performances - 30%
Educational Workshops - 5%
Some of All of the Above - 20%

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